Georgia

E. Appellate proceedings

Overview

Georgia

Appellate proceedings are also presumptively open. Appeal court dockets and opinions can be found at www.gaappeals.us. Supreme Court of Georgia opinions and dockets are available at www.gasupreme.us.

B. Circumstances where cameras are permitted

Overview

Georgia

As long as the notification requirements for the court in which access is needed are complied with, cameras may generally be used in any judicial proceedings in the trial courts of Georgia, the Court of Appeals of Georgia and the Supreme Court of Georgia.

E. Categories of meetings subject to the law.

(This section is blank. See the subpoints below.)

B. Elements

A subpoenaing party seeking to compel testimony or documents from a member of the news media who has invoked the privilege must show that the information sought (1) is material and relevant; (2) cannot be reasonably obtained by alternative means; and (3) is necessary to the proper preparation or presentation of the case of a party seeking the information, document, or item. O.C.G.A. § 24-9-30.

3. Contents of a written request.

(This section is blank. See the subpoints below.)

2. Public matter message on government hardware.

A public matter message on government hardware is subject to the Act’s disclosure requirements.

1. Who may sue?

A suit to enforce compliance with the Act may be brought in superior court "by any person, firm, corporation, or other entity." O.C.G.A. § 50-14-5(a). In addition, the Attorney General may bring civil or criminal actions to enforce compliance with the Act. O.C.G.A. § 50-14-5(a).

D. Grand jury proceedings

Overview

Georgia

Traditionally in Georgia, the public has no First Amendment right of access to grand jury proceedings and records, since such proceedings have been historically and presumptively secret. Members of a grand jury in Georgia take a statutorily-prescribed oath to keep deliberations of the grand jury secret.

E. Tips on decorum in courts within the jurisdiction

Overview

Georgia

Laptops and cellular phones are typically permitted in state court, although rules vary from court to court and judge to judge. See e.g., Media Protocol for Fulton County Superior Court (“laptop computers, blackberries, cell phones will be permitted as long as the equipment is kept in the silent mode and the clicking of keys on the keyboard cannot be heard.”). Federal court rules vary as well. See, e.g., United States v. Jackson, No. 93-CR-310-AAA (N.D.

(1). Time limit for giving notice.

Unless "special circumstances" are declared by the agency, any meeting not held in accordance with the regular schedule requires at least 24 hours notice. O.C.G.A. § 50-14-1(d).