R5A1

1. Who receives a request?

1. Who receives a request?

Each authority is required to designate one or more custodians and to post prominently at its offices a notice containing a description of its organization and the times and places at which, the legal custodian from whom, and the methods whereby, the public may obtain information and access to records. Wis. Stat. § 19.34(1).

1. Who receives a request?

The Public Records Act is not specific about where requests must be made, other than it directs a public officer "having the custody of public records" to give copies upon request, and also indicates that public records of all public agencies are available for inspection "during regular office hours." Regulations adopted by the state to govern records requests made of state agencies provide that requests for records of a state agency may be filed at the nearest office of the appropriate agency. 2 AAC 96.305.

1. Who receives a request?

A request for a public record should be directed at the "official custodian" of the records, which is the "chief administrative officer or any other officer or employee of a public agency who is responsible for the maintenance, care and keeping of public records." Ky. Rev. Stat. 61.870(5).

If the person to whom the request is sent is not the official custodian, that person is required to notify the requester and provide the official custodian's name and address. Ky. Rev. Stat. 61.872.

1. Who receives a request?

Requests for public records may be made to the custodian of the public record. One trial court ruled that a local government cannot construct barriers to public records access by requiring requests to be filtered through a county manager or some other designated public official. Dawes v. Buncombe County Board of Commissioners, 99 CVS 03497 (September 1, 1999).

1. Who receives a request?

The custodian of any public record. Wyo. Stat. § § 16-4-202, 203(1977).

1. Who receives a request?

Requests to inspect public records should be directed to the public “officer” who maintains custody of the documents.  While some agencies may have freedom of information officers assigned to disclosure requests, it is advisable also to direct such requests to the “person elected or appointed to hold any elective or appointive office of any public body and any chief administrative officer, head, director, superintendent or chairman of any public body.”  A.R.S. § 39-121.01(A)(1).

1. Who receives a request?

The "custodian" of public records is "the public official or head of any public body having custody or control of a public record, or a representative specifically authorized by him to respond to requests to inspect any such public records." La. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 44:1(A)(3) (emphasis added). A person is the "custodian" of a public record if he or she has "control" over the records at issue; physical possession is not prerequisite. Times-Picayune Publishing Corp. v. Johnson, 645 So. 2d 1174 (La. App. 4th Cir.

1. Who receives a request?

Any official of any agency can be asked for public records. It is worth noting many older records are maintained by the records management program of the state information technology department. See N.D.C.C. Ch. 54-46. Inquiries for records that are no longer available through the relevant agency should be directed to this office. The records management program can be reached at (701) 328-3585.

1. Who receives a request?

The request should be directed to the “custodian” of the records. Ark. Code Ann. § 25-19-105(a)(2)(A). The term “custodian” is defined as “the person having administrative control of that record,” but it does not include “a person who holds public records solely for the purposes of storage, safekeeping, or data processing for others.” Id. § 25-19-103(1)(A) & (B) (added by Act 1653 of 2001). Under this definition, an agency’s chief administrator should be considered the custodian, since he or she has ultimate control over its records.

1. Who receives a request?

A request for a record should be presented to the custodian of the record or to the office in which the record is likely to be located.