3C3

3. Grand jury

3. Grand jury

There is no statutory or case law addressing this issue.

3. Grand jury

Where the press is subpoenaed in the context of a grand Jury investigation, there is no doubt as to whether the Sixth Circuit recognizes any special prerogative of the press to resist the subpoena.

3. Grand jury

The privilege applies to grand jury subpoenas. See, e.g., O.C.G.A. § 24-9-30 (privilege applies "in any proceeding where the one asserting the privilege is not a party"); In re Paul, 270 Ga. 680, 684 (Ga. 1999).

3. Grand jury

The North Dakota Supreme Court has stated that the nature of the action is something that the trial court may consider in determining whether disclosure is appropriate. The statute does not make a distinction between grand jury subpoenas and those issued during discovery. Accordingly, the privilege should not be more difficult to defend at this level.

3. Grand jury

Grand jury subpoenas are treated the same as any other subpoena under the statute. See Neb. Rev. Stat. § 86-708(1) (Reissue 1999) noting that grand jury subpoenas shall not suspend or otherwise interfere with the shield law. Nebraska rarely utilizes grand juries. The authors are not aware of any grand jury subpoenas having been issued to reporters.

3. Grand jury

The Virginia Supreme Court has not articulated a different standard for grand jury subpoenas.

3. Grand jury

No federal cases in the Seventh Circuit discussed whether the reporters' privilege applies to grand jury subpoenas.

3. Grand jury

There is no Hawai'i law regarding whether the privilege differs with respect to grand jury subpoenas.

3. Grand jury

There is no statutory or case law establishing different standards for grand jury subpoenas.

3. Grand jury

Washington rarely uses grand juries and there is no case authority regarding grand jury subpoenas.