News

Format: 2017-08-23
Format: 2017-08-23
October 5, 1993
CANADA -- The American media and computer enthusiasts joined forces to disseminate information in two recent cases where the Canadian press has been gagged.
October 5, 1993
PENNSYLVANIA -- A mid-September meeting of the Fayette County Housing Authority in Uniontown ended in turmoil after the board voted to prohibit the use of video equipment during its meetings. After the authority unanimously adopted the policy, it adjourned for five minutes to allow the removal of all videocameras. However, a video crew from the Uniontown Herald-Standard refused to leave, citing its right to videotape under the state's Right To Know Law.
October 5, 1993
SOUTH CAROLINA -- The South Carolina Supreme Court unanimously approved an amendment to the state constitution in late September making cameras in the courtroom permanent after a successful year and a half long experiment. The South Carolina Press Association and Broadcaster's Steering Committee has worked with the state high court and the State Bar for the past five and a half years on the cameras in courts issue.
September 14, 1993
PENNSYLVANIA -- A York County judge halted exclusion hearings for immigrants at a local jail Aug. 31 because the facility's rules excluded the public. The hearings were moved to another location and opened the same day.
September 14, 1993
CALIFORNIA -- U.S. District Court Judge Eugene F. Lynch ordered a new trial in the labyrinthine libel case pitting psychoanalyst Jeffrey M. Masson against author Janet Malcolm. Masson had sued Malcolm for libel, claiming she had fabricated quotes attributed to him in her series published in the New Yorker magazine in 1983. In his early September ruling, the San Francisco judge also dismissed the New Yorker from the case, and ordered Masson to pay the magazine an estimated $20,000 in court costs, the New York Times reported.
September 14, 1993
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Attorney General Janet Reno, noting her commitment to open government dating from her years in Florida, the "Sunshine State," promised "complete review" of the Department of Justice Freedom of Information Act policy in response to a question at a press conference in late August.
September 14, 1993
VIRGINIA -- Five of the six candidates for three top statewide offices debated behind closed doors in late August. The debate, sponsored by the state Fraternal Order of Police, was apparently the first to be held in private in Virginia's modern history, political scientist Mark J. Rozell told the Washington Post. There was no press coverage of the event. Michael P. Farris, the Republican nominee for lieutenant governor, unsuccessfully attempted to open the debate to the press and the public. He considered tape recording the debate but decided not to participate.
September 14, 1993
CONNECTICUT -- The state Freedom of Information Act limits the disclosure of arrest records to basic information relating to an arrest until the related criminal prosecution is over, the Connecticut Supreme Court held in early September.
September 14, 1993
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Air Force cannot routinely withhold poll results from a survey of the views of enlisted men and officers on their working conditions, a federal appeals court ruled in early August. Although the Air Force issued press releases on some favorable findings from the surveys, it denied requests for other poll results, claiming they were "pre-decisional." The FOI Act operates on the premise that "government will function best if its warts as well as its wonders are available for public review," the appeals panel wrote.
September 14, 1993
CALIFORNIA -- A state judge in Riverside ordered ABC News in late August to give prosecutors unaired tape of a jailhouse interview with Benny Powell, who has been accused of rape. Powell attracted national attention last year when he and another man were released from prison 17 years after their wrongful conviction for murder.
September 14, 1993
NEW JERSEY -- With the onset of another political campaign season, ABC affiliates in New York City and Philadelphia must air a controversial political ad opposing automatic weapons, the New York Times reported.
September 14, 1993
MAINE -- The future of cameras and broadcast equipment in Maine's trial courts will remain undecided until Nov. 30, following a two-year experimental project that ended in August. Between July 1991 and August 1993, the experiment permitted broadcasters and photographers access to certain proceedings in Bangor and Portland trial courts, except those involving sex and some violent crimes.
September 14, 1993
NORTH CAROLINA -- A Greensboro eye clinic filed a defamation lawsuit in federal district court in Greensboro in late August against NBC, alleging that the program "Dateline NBC" falsely accused the clinic of nearly performing unnecessary surgery on a patient.