News

Format: 2018-07-20
Format: 2018-07-20
November 30, 1993
Council boards up press building 11/30/1993 MONTANA -- In late November, construction workers boarded up a building that housed offices used by the publisher of a small newspaper, effectively locking him out, after he questioned activities of the Blackfeet Tribal Business Council, the building's owner.
November 30, 1993
Afghan guerrillas release AP reporter 11/30/1993 WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Hezb-e-Islami guerrillas in Afghanistan released two journalists, one of whom is American, in mid-November after holding them for a week. U.S. officials, in contact with the Afghan Embassy in Washington and with Prime Minister Gulbuddin Hekmatyar's representatives in Islamabad, Pakistan, pressed for the reporters' freedom, and U.S. officials reported they were being well-treated.
November 30, 1993
Judge refuses to clarify probation provision that bars former fugitive from 'profiting' 11/30/1993 MASSACHUSETTS -- On October 29 a state court judge denied former fugitive Katherine Power's request for clarification of a condition of her probation that prohibits her from receiving "profit or benefit" from telling her story. Power, a fugitive for 23 years, was wanted for her role a 1970 bank robbery in which a Boston police officer was killed. She surrendered to authorities in September.
November 30, 1993
New rules make complaints by citizens against lawyers open to public in Vermont 11/30/1993 VERMONT -- Under new rules issued by the state's Supreme Court, complaints by citizens against lawyers are now public as soon as the Professional Conduct Board notifies the attorney that he or she faces charges.
November 16, 1993
Judge backs down on order to remove newsracks 11/16/1993 FLORIDA -- A county judge who ordered the removal of 17 news racks because he said they were "unsightly," in early November allowed them to remain if they were moved 25 feet down the sidewalk from the court house.
November 16, 1993
Montana governor opens cabinet meetings 11/16/1993 MONTANA -- Montana Gov. Marc Racicot announced in early November that all his meetings with cabinet officers, including meetings with only some cabinet officers, will be open to the public. Under the new policy, the governor's meetings will be closed only if there is a compelling need to protect some person's privacy.
November 16, 1993
State appeals court upholds judge's order barring reports on juvenile records 11/16/1993 MINNESOTA -- The Minnesota Court of Appeals in St. Paul ruled in early November that a trial judge was correct in restricting journalists from reporting the juvenile records and names of three girls who were allegedly molested by an employee of a state youth ranch for troubled teen-agers.
November 16, 1993
City council members fined for violations 11/16/1993 MINNESOTA -- Four members of the Hibbing City Council, including the mayor, must pay hundreds of dollars in fines and attorneys fees for violating the state's open meetings law, the state's appeals court ruled in late October. However the court rejected an appeal by several of the town's residents that the officials should be removed from office for repeated violations of the law.
November 16, 1993
Judge issues opinion affirming $34 million libel award 11/16/1993 PENNSYLVANIA -- In late October a state judge in Philadelphia issued a 170-page opinion upholding a $34 million libel award against the Philadelphia Inquirer in a long-running suit by Richard A. Sprague, a former prosecutor.
November 16, 1993
University officials agree to release videotape of trampling at stadium 11/16/1993 WISCONSIN -- University of Wisconsin officials agreed to release a videotape of last month's trampling incident at Camp Randall Stadium after the Wisconsin State Journal filed suit.
November 16, 1993
New York high court breathes new life into libel suit against medical examiner 11/16/1993 NEW YORK -- In late October, New York's highest court, the Court of Appeals in Albany, reinstated a libel suit filed against the New York Times by the former medical examiner of New York City.
November 16, 1993
U.S. Supreme Court drops restrictions on access to tapes of oral arguments 11/16/1993 WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Supreme Court dropped restrictions on access to copies of oral arguments audiotapes in early November just three months after it threatened to consider "legal remedies" against a California professor for selling copies of the tapes.
November 16, 1993
Police chief's 'confidential' police calls found to be to secretary and beauty salon 11/16/1993 ILLINOIS -- An October check of former Belleville Police Chief Robert Hurst's mobile telephone records showed that a third of the calls he blacked out as confidential police business were made to his secretary at her home and at a salon where she worked part- time, according to the Belleville News Democrat.
November 16, 1993
FCC upholds first fine levied against Stern 11/16/1993 WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Federal Communications Commission upheld its first indecency fine in late October against Infinity Broadcasting Corp. for a Howard Stern show. The fine, a $6,000 penalty for allegedly indecent programming, was issued for Stern's "Christmas Party" broadcast in December 1988.
November 16, 1993
Television producer sues, alleging censorship of program 11/16/1993 COLORADO -- More than a year after it was produced, Denver Community Television in November broadcast a gay and lesbian talk show program that is the subject of a civil rights suit.