News

Format: 2018-09-19
Format: 2018-09-19
November 16, 1993
Montana governor opens cabinet meetings 11/16/1993 MONTANA -- Montana Gov. Marc Racicot announced in early November that all his meetings with cabinet officers, including meetings with only some cabinet officers, will be open to the public. Under the new policy, the governor's meetings will be closed only if there is a compelling need to protect some person's privacy.
November 16, 1993
State appeals court upholds judge's order barring reports on juvenile records 11/16/1993 MINNESOTA -- The Minnesota Court of Appeals in St. Paul ruled in early November that a trial judge was correct in restricting journalists from reporting the juvenile records and names of three girls who were allegedly molested by an employee of a state youth ranch for troubled teen-agers.
November 16, 1993
City council members fined for violations 11/16/1993 MINNESOTA -- Four members of the Hibbing City Council, including the mayor, must pay hundreds of dollars in fines and attorneys fees for violating the state's open meetings law, the state's appeals court ruled in late October. However the court rejected an appeal by several of the town's residents that the officials should be removed from office for repeated violations of the law.
November 16, 1993
Judge issues opinion affirming $34 million libel award 11/16/1993 PENNSYLVANIA -- In late October a state judge in Philadelphia issued a 170-page opinion upholding a $34 million libel award against the Philadelphia Inquirer in a long-running suit by Richard A. Sprague, a former prosecutor.
November 16, 1993
University officials agree to release videotape of trampling at stadium 11/16/1993 WISCONSIN -- University of Wisconsin officials agreed to release a videotape of last month's trampling incident at Camp Randall Stadium after the Wisconsin State Journal filed suit.
November 16, 1993
New York high court breathes new life into libel suit against medical examiner 11/16/1993 NEW YORK -- In late October, New York's highest court, the Court of Appeals in Albany, reinstated a libel suit filed against the New York Times by the former medical examiner of New York City.
November 16, 1993
U.S. Supreme Court drops restrictions on access to tapes of oral arguments 11/16/1993 WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Supreme Court dropped restrictions on access to copies of oral arguments audiotapes in early November just three months after it threatened to consider "legal remedies" against a California professor for selling copies of the tapes.
November 16, 1993
Police chief's 'confidential' police calls found to be to secretary and beauty salon 11/16/1993 ILLINOIS -- An October check of former Belleville Police Chief Robert Hurst's mobile telephone records showed that a third of the calls he blacked out as confidential police business were made to his secretary at her home and at a salon where she worked part- time, according to the Belleville News Democrat.
November 16, 1993
FCC upholds first fine levied against Stern 11/16/1993 WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Federal Communications Commission upheld its first indecency fine in late October against Infinity Broadcasting Corp. for a Howard Stern show. The fine, a $6,000 penalty for allegedly indecent programming, was issued for Stern's "Christmas Party" broadcast in December 1988.
November 16, 1993
Television producer sues, alleging censorship of program 11/16/1993 COLORADO -- More than a year after it was produced, Denver Community Television in November broadcast a gay and lesbian talk show program that is the subject of a civil rights suit.
November 2, 1993
Bill would close driver's records nationwide 11/02/1993 WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Reporters could no longer look at the driving records of any driver licensed by any state if a bill introduced in late October by Rep. James Moran (D-Va.) is enacted.
November 2, 1993
Press association head challenges secret state Supreme Court actions 11/02/1993 NEVADA -- Nevada Press Association President Ande Engleman filed a complaint in mid- October with the state Judicial Discipline Commission in response to a secret state Supreme Court decision to remove a case from the docket and stop disciplinary proceedings against a state judge. Engleman wants to open and unseal the proceedings and protect reporters from having to reveal sources.
November 2, 1993
3 plead guilty to planning editor's murder 11/02/1993 NEW YORK -- Three people pleaded guilty to helping arrange the execution-style murder of New York journalist Manuel de Dios Unanue, who was shot to death in March 1992 on the order of a Colombian drug lord, according to newspaper reports and court papers unsealed in late October.
November 2, 1993
Reno threatens to use government restrictions to control violence on television 11/02/1993 WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Attorney General Janet Reno gave the television industry an ultimatum on Oct. 20: significantly reduce television violence by Jan. 1 or the government will enact laws to do it for you.
November 2, 1993
Prosecutor drops charges against man accused of stealing papers from library 11/02/1993 MARYLAND -- The Maryland State's Attorney dropped criminal charges in late October against Stephen George Tyma, who was charged with removing copies of a free gay newspaper from a public library in Wheaton. "Now people who take it have carte blanche," said T.J. Mueller, circulation manager for the Washington Blade. "I was disappointed."