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Report: Two finalists for U.S. attorney spot supported secrecy

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  1. Court Access
The Broward Bulldog reported last week that two of the three finalists for a U.S. attorney post in southern Florida…

The Broward Bulldog reported last week that two of the three finalists for a U.S. attorney post in southern Florida have been involved in controversies regarding court records — one for altering a docket in apparent violation of state law and another who helped prosecute a secret case in the wake of Sept. 11.

According to the Bulldog, the list included Judge Daryl Trawick, who had a court clerk alter a public docket in 2002 at the request of state prosecutors who sought to protect an informant — Florida law prohibits anyone, including judges, clerks and "other public officers" from altering or falsifying court records — and maintained a private docket in the case. The Miami Herald covered the matter in 2006.

Another nominee, David M. Buckner, served as an assistant U.S. attorney during a controversial secret immigration proceeding, M.K.B. v. Warden. Federal district and appellate courts had considered the case of an Algerian-born man, who had filed a habeas corpus petition challenging his captivity soon after the events of September 11, in complete secrecy, even keeping the case off the courts’ dockets. The U.S. Supreme Court denied review, allowing the secrecy to stand.

The third nominee is assistant Miami-Dade County Attorney Wilfredo “Willy” Ferrer.