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In late February, the American Bar Association announced the launch of a campaign for camera access to the U.S. Supreme…

In late February, the American Bar Association announced the launch of a campaign for camera access to the U.S. Supreme Court. The announcement came at a press conference releasing the results of a national research survey about the public’s current understanding of and attitudes about the American justice system.

ABA President Phillip Anderson asserted that allowing cameras into all courts, including the Supreme Court, will show the public how the government truly works. The survey revealed that many people have little understanding of how the government truly works, Anderson said, and 61% of the people polled want to know more about the justice system.

Anderson said he believes that cameras in the Supreme Court will help to lessen the perception of bias that minorities believe exists in the court system. Of those polled, 56% believed that courts do not treat all racial and ethnic groups the same. Anderson said that this lack of faith will eventually erode confidence in our courts.

Anderson added that letting cameras into the court will reverse the disenchantment that exists among voters.