Utah

Utah has, at least implicitly, recognized the four privacy torts. See Cox v. Hatch, 761 P.2d 556 (Utah 1988).

Intrusion: The First Amendment barred an intrusion claim brought by a group of postal workers depicted with Sen. Orrin Hatch in a campaign flier. Their privacy interest was deemed minimal when the workers had permitted the picture to be taken in a public, or semi-public, area with a political candidate. The court held alternatively that the workers had no reasonable expectation of privacy when their photograph was taken in an open, common workplace, and they had consented to the photograph. , 761 P.2d 556 (Utah 1988).

The First Amendment barred a private facts claim brought by a group of postal workers pictured with Sen. Orrin Hatch in a campaign advertisement. The picture was taken in an open, common workplace and did not reveal private facts. , 761 P.2d 556 (Utah 1988).

The First Amendment barred the false light claim asserted by certain postal workers pictured with Sen. Orrin Hatch in a campaign advertisement. The implication of support for a ceratin candidate or membership in a political party would not be highly offensive to a reasonable person. , 761 P.2d 556 (Utah 1988).

The First Amendment barred an appropriation claim brought by a group of postal workers depicted with Sen. Orrin Hatch in a campaign flier. Their privacy interests were deemed minimal when the workers had permitted the picture to be taken in a public, or semi-public, place with a political candidate. The court held alternatively that the workers endorsements had no intrinsic value, and their likenesses were merely incidental to the flier. , 761 P.2d 556 (Utah 1988).